Archive

Methods for Addressing Technology-induced Errors: The Current State

Journal: IMIA Yearbook
ISSN: 0943-4747
Topic:

Unintended Consequences: New Problems and New Solutions

DOI: https://doi.org/10.15265/IY-2016-029
Issue: 2016: IMIA Yearbook 2016
Pages: 30-40

Methods for Addressing Technology-induced Errors: The Current State

Special Section: Unintended Consequences: New Problems and New Solutions

Working Group Contributions

E. Borycki (1), J. W. Dexheimer (2), C. Hullin Lucay Cossio (3), Y. Gong (4), S. Jensen (5), J. Kaipio (6), S. Kennebeck (7), E. Kirkendall (8, 9), A. W. Kushniruk (1), C. Kuziemsky (10), R. Marcilly (11), R. Röhrig (12), K. Saranto (13), Y. Senathirajah (14), J. Weber (15), H. Takeda (16)

(1) School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; (2) Division of Emergency Medicine, Division of Biomedical Informatics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America; (3) Duoc UC, Santiago, Chile; (4) School of Biomedical Informatics, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, United States of America; (5) Center of IT, Medical Tech. and Telephony, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; (6) Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland; (7) Division of Emergency Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America; (8) Division of Biomedical Informatics, Department of Information Services, Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; (9) James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; (10) Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; (11) INSERM CIC-IT 1403 / Evalab, Lille, Univ Lille Nord de France, CHU Lille, Lille, France; (12) Department for Medical Informatics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg, Germany; (13) University of Eastern Finland, Department of Health and Social Management, Kuopio, Finland; (14) Department of Medical Informatics, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA; (15) Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; (16) Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Jikei Institute, Osaka, Japan

Keywords

Patient safety, risk management, Safety, Health information technology, technology-induced error

Summary

Objectives: The objectives of this paper are to review and discuss the methods that are being used internationally to report on, mitigate, and eliminate technology-induced errors. Methods: The IMIA Working Group for Health Informatics for Patient Safety worked together to review and synthesize some of the main methods and approaches associated with technology- induced error reporting, reduction, and mitigation. The work involved a review of the evidence-based literature as well as guideline publications specific to health informatics. Results: The paper presents a rich overview of current approaches, issues, and methods associated with: (1) safe HIT design, (2) safe HIT implementation, (3) reporting on technology-induced errors, (4) technology-induced error analysis, and (5) health information technology (HIT) risk management. The work is based on research from around the world. Conclusions: Internationally, researchers have been developing methods that can be used to identify, report on, mitigate, and eliminate technology-induced errors. Although there remain issues and challenges associated with the methodologies, they have been shown to improve the quality and safety of HIT. Since the first publications documenting technology-induced errors in healthcare in 2005, we have seen in a short 10 years researchers develop ways of identifying and addressing these types of errors. We have also seen organizations begin to use these approaches. Knowledge has been translated into practice in a short ten years whereas the norm for other research areas is of 20 years.

You may also be interested in...

1.
Development of a Structural Equation Model

V. Jylhä (1), S. Mikkonen (2), K. Saranto (1), D. W. Bates (3, 4)

Methods Inf Med 2017 56 Open: e30-e38

https://doi.org/10.3414/ME16-01-0075

2.

Case Report

A. Fong (1), J. L. Howe (1), K. T. Adams (1), R. M. Ratwani (1, 2)

Appl Clin Inform 2017 8 1: 35-46

https://doi.org/10.4338/ACI-2016-09-CR-0148

3.

Section 2: Human Factors and Organizational Issues

Working Group Contribution

A. Kushniruk (1, 2), C. Nohr (2), E. Borycki (1)

Yearb Med Inform 2016 : 120-125

https://doi.org/10.15265/IY-2016-024